Choosing a Lawn Care Company, continued

I want to build off the last post a little bit by adding some ideas when looking to hire a lawn care company. If you read “What is the best lawn care company“, there will be some repetition here. But I want to quickly go over some things to look for as a homeowner to make sure you hire a competent company.

Of course some of the basics always apply regardless of what need you are looking for, plumbing, painting, lawn care or anything else. An initial search will eliminate some companies off your list right away because their contact info is wrong. And then as you start to call, the list will get shorter. They will not answer, call back or be dismissive on the phone. If they are late without a call, or don’t show up (duh), never call them again. And any gut feeling you have when talking with them about the person and company they are. These are basic ways to cross companies off your list.

I recently needed plumbing help and I paid careful attention to how companies handle me as a consumer. I did a google search for plumbers in the area and started calling around. About half of my original list was immediately crossed out because of their answering system. I shouldn’t have to go out of my way to pay you. And I shouldn’t be required to ask the right question in order for you to do the right thing. A couple of these companies left it up to me to tell them how to operate, “Soo, is a guy coming out?” They should listen to you and find out what you need, and then explain how they can help.

For me, the operation of a company is important. I do not want to be required to figure out what you are supposed to do. So when meeting or talking to companies, how well can they explain what you are paying for? A good company will be able to paint a pretty good picture of what they will do. The relationship is mutual, and needs to be fair. You will pay them, so find out what they will do in return. The program they offer should be easily explained and probably be printed out on professional letterhead so you can keep it and go over it. The process in which they will provide the service should be easily explained as well. If they talk in general terms, they are not the best guys. “We’ll treat your lawn with whatever it needs” is a general term. Get specifics from them. Some specifics are what fertilizer’s are used, what’s the calendar, their plan for weed control, how their operation works with concerning you, the billing process (to name a few).

Price of course is important. I recommend to negotiate a ‘market value’ for you lawn. Please go to our¬†Pricing page¬†and check out our price sheet as a guideline. 10,000 square feet should cost around $55 per treatment. Don’t pay much higher, but also don’t pay much lower. If you have a large lawn paying $30, it’s very likely you are not getting the proper amount of fertilizer and weed control. This is a business relationship and needs to be equal, so it has to be worth it for the company as well. If they are not making much money, or even losing money, than corners will be cut. I suggest to be in the ball park of ‘market value’ so the balance is fair for customer and company. You don’t want to be the customer where the lawn technician wants to skip because it’s a waste of time.

It is a service that you are looking for, so the operation needs to be smooth. If it’s not, than more than likely they will not treat your lawn properly. And the operation should be smooth from your initial contact, through the hiring process and then into billing. Should be explained properly so you know what to expect.

 

www.greatcarelawnservice.com